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rayke1938

New PFD regs Qld.?

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Just been having a browse through the new PFD regs that come into force next year.

See that PFD type 1 has been made compulsory for PWC if more than 2 KS off shore.

Will this be the same for yaks?

Does a yakker have to wear a pfd when crossing designated bars?

See a lot not wearing them on the seaway so will they now have to wear a pfd?

If you do not like the inflatable ones i reckon it would be uncomfortable wearing one with a high collar and having to paddle .

Like the new one about speed limit for PWC close to other craft.

Trouble will be enforcing it.

Cheers

Ray

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Sorry, but I disagree.

I think the more moderate approch QLD has taken is far better than slapping a blanket rule on. Please login or register to see this image. /emoticons/default_cool.png" alt="B)">

How does the Tassie rule go with charter boats, cruise passengers and ferry passengers? Please login or register to see this image. /emoticons/default_unsure.png" alt=":unsure:">

Surely it would cause some real headaches if it was all people on boats must wear PFD's at all times???

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I agree that people in smaller boats should be made to wear pdf's all the time mainly due to the traffic they may encounter (never know when some retard in a big LOOK @ ME boat will go roaring past )

But a blanket rule :evil: :evil:

That's just plain dumb IMO :pinch:

Gaz

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The new rule so far is for jet skis offshore i don't see a need to make it a blanket rule for everyone fishing it makes it very uncomfortable to wear 1 at all times. Why do we need legislation to protect people from themselves when most experienced boaties know when there is a need to wear pfd's and that should be sufficent. As for tasmania they need all the help they can get

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Please login or register to see this quote.

yep I agree.... let natural selection take its` course Please login or register to see this image. /emoticons/default_wink.png" alt=";)" srcset="//content.invisioncic.com/r264089/emoticons/wink@2x.png 2x" width="20" height="20">

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Thanks Ray for the welcome back (never left just not posted lol ) :whistle:

what I find funny about the reg in Tas yes it's cold BUT you die just as quik from hyperthermia if you float or sink spose it make's it easier to find the bodies :woohoo:

Gaz

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From hobart mercury. Reflects my personal opinion inflatables are not worth a pinch of proverbial.Only time they would nbe ok would be in a plane if bthey filled them with helium and you could jump out and float down. Please login or register to see this image. /emoticons/default_tongue.png" alt=":P" srcset="//content.invisioncic.com/r264089/emoticons/tongue@2x.png 2x" width="20" height="20">

Cheers

Ray

BRUCE MOUNSTER | December 22, 2010 02.00am

THE drowning of a 59-year-old woman casts doubt on the safety of manually inflated life jackets, a coroner says.

Coroner Stephen Carey yesterday found Longford mother Ann Marie Mills had been wearing a Stormy Seas life jacket but it wasn't inflated when she drowned in February.

Mills and four friends were on a seaworthy 7m aluminium speedboat, retrieving cray pots near St Helens when a freak wave capsized the vessel.

Mr Carey said the skipper and three passengers surfaced under the upturned boat and it appeared Mrs Mills had been thrown clear.

He said two female passengers had been wearing the same type of manually inflated life jacket as Mrs Mills and neither had inflated theirs.

Mr Carey said that after they got themselves clear of the hull, the skipper inflated the jackets for them by pulling down a flap that activated an inflation gas canister.

He said the skipper recalled having trouble inflating the jackets because of the amount of force required.

Mr Carey said a male passenger who hadn't been wearing a life jacket tired quickly but held onto the jacket of a female passenger and stayed afloat.

He said the skipper, who was not wearing a life jacket, had clung to the boat.

"This tragic accident highlights the need for all boat owners and their passengers to consider if this type of manual-inflation vest is suitable for them, as they offer no protection to persons in the water who are unconscious or unable to activate them," he said.

Marine and Safety Tasmania recreational boating manager Peter Hopkins said Tasmanians were abandoning the bulky but trusty foam life jackets, in favour of inflatables.

Mr Hopkins said a recent survey found 71 per cent of boat owners used the more comfortable inflatables.

Mr Hopkins said most inflatables were manually inflated but said he understood reputable manufacturers, such as Stormy Seas, had plans to phase them out, in favour of ones which inflated automatically on contact with water.

Mr Hopkins said MAST was concerned only about 2 per cent of inflatable-jacket users were taking them in for recommended checks and servicing.

Last week, MAST mailed pamphlets urging boat owners to make sure life jackets were in working order.

Mr Hopkins said cheap inflatable life jackets from stores that didn't specialise in marine equipment were causing concern, despite often meeting Australian standards.

"Before you buy one, make sure there's someone in the state who can service them," he said.

Mr Hopkins said that in 2001 Tasmania became one of the first jurisdictions in the world to make the wearing of life jackets compulsory in power boats shorter than 6m.

"Drowning rates have gone down," he said.

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I for one use an auto inflatable PFD and have done so for more than 20 years.Mine is the latest RFD 150 auto which inflates in 5 seconds of hitting the water and turns the wearer over in the same time so he is floating face up. This is in case the wearer is knocked out in an accident.I cant swim so I've relied on a PFD all my fishing life and I recommend the use of them to everone. You life is the only one you have so look after it.Get your inflatable serviced by RFD or similar service companies each year and they will last for many years. :cheer: Safe fishing and tight lines. Ian M

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