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Drop Bear

Green Marlin.

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    Ok so over in Fiji the markets are full of barracuda.

    The locals love them saying they are sweet, delicious and when I asked if they are full of bones they looks strange at me and said. No just the same.

    So why have they got such an appalling reputation as a table fish in Australia? What am I missing? A few months back I was privileged enough to go on a trip with @benno573 and we saw a monster at the side of the boat that had followed up one of the fish. It didn't really occur to me to catch it as it would be a long battle and then release the fish...

    But now I'm hungry for the cuda!

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    I think it's more of a myth, however I have not personally eaten one. I have heard it's good chewing. 

    The larger ones have been known to contain ciguatera so maybe that has a bit to do with it also.  

     

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    Probably due to the strong smell and slime when they are alive and the strong fishy taste (similar to, but far stronger than mackerel in my opinion). I have eaten them in Samoa floured, salted and fried with a sprinkle of MSG and Indonesia grilled over coals with a char siu style BBQ sauce - both delicious. In Indo they call them white marlin cos the Aussie tourists won't eat "barracuda" but will eat "marlin". Have caught a few in Oz and don't tend to let them onto the boat given their big peg-like teeth and risk of ciguatera. Usually have other more desirable eating species on board when you come across them too.

    Here's a pic of a Samoan barracuda my brother caught. Great fight with lots of aerial antics and played up in the boat as expected. Yep the locals went crazy for it and cooked us up a feed once the mackerel and trout ran out.

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    Poor mans spaniard apparently. I remember catching heaps up at Hinchinbrook as a kid, and them having a distinctive ammonia smell to them. We would pull our lures away from them most times and gave them the nickname 'stinkers'.

    Though I got one in PNG Robbie, probably around the 60cm mark. Martin definitely didn't say no to it and gave me the thumbs up when I asked what they were like.

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