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UQ Lakes Unfortunate Surprise!


qbkami

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During my time at UQ ( Over 4 years now )I've always crossed the uq lakes to get to my lectures which is right beside the main lake thus I travel through the three lakes and being a fisherman my eyes are always attracted to the water every time i pass them... Last Wednesday as i was crossing the first set of lakes something caught my eye which wasn't the typical eel or turtle... At first i thought :woohoo: UQ has introduced bass into there lakes! Until i took a closer look at BAM! WTF it was small schools of Tilapia all around the lake :ohmy: :sick: they were around the 10cm mark or more! I just cant believe this happened all of a sudden! I wonder if the UQ lake maintenance know about this...

Does this mean i can fish in the lakes for a Tilly Bash every now and then? :)

Big shock to me when i saw the schools of them scattered everywhere, like leaves on the surface of the water...

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I just reported your sighting to fisheries.

I also walk past those lakes everyday but I've never noticed them in there. What type of tilapia do you think they are?

I will pick up with UQ facilities when I'm next back on campus to see if they know about them being in the lakes.

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The no take & eat policy aims to reduce the spread of tilapia by human assistance which is responsible for most of the spread of them to new water.

Most waterways in Qld don't have them & it would be nice to keep it that way. Once they're in, you'll never get them out.

By allowing people to catch & eat them, you're simply encouraging people to put them into water nearer where they live.

In addition, angling is of no use in reducing their numbers. They simply breed to fast.

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I just reported your sighting to fisheries.

I also walk past those lakes everyday but I've never noticed them in there. What type of Tilapia do you think they are?

I will pick up with UQ facilities when I'm next back on campus to see if they know about them being in the lakes.

Yeah thanks for informing the fisheries about that.

I didnt know there was different types of Tilapia, only thought there was one type.

I am too planning to inform UQ about its infestation when i get back to uni.

Cheers,

Quang

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There are two types in Australia. The Mangroves and Mozambique tilapias. It seems that the mangrove tilapia is only found up north and the Mozambique tilapia is further south

Ah okay i had a quick search on google and they look like the Mozambique Tilapia.

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I dont know the lakes you are talking about, (never been on the campus) but lets hope they don't drain into the Brisbane river!!!

Too bad, they already have. Tilapia have already been caught at the port of bris so if theres 1 there's a million of them :evil:

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They're a common capture up the top of the big river, as well as the pine and most lakes, creeks and drains you care to mention. About the only system I can think of without them is the Murray-darling, somehow I don't think the allowing of taking them for a feed is going to have a devastating effect as if they are in these systems then I am sorry but the damage is done.

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Hi Surfingant,

I recently attended a presentation by Fisheries re pest fish and according to them, out of 72 river systems in Qld, tilapia are only in 18 of them so IMO, anything to limit their spread is good.

That's why Fisheries won't do anything to give them any value such as catching & eating or any other use(eg fertilizer like carp).

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did the lakes go under in the flood? fair chance they came from the flood water, they are very thick throughout the brisbane river and all its creeks.. i have noticed them in boggy creek a fair bit lately too.. forest lake flows into oxley creek which in turn flows into brisbane river, every time the lakes flow over more and more tilapia escape, why has the been nothing done at at forest lake for their invested population..

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Whilst they are in most waterways in the eastern seaboard they are not in the Gulf system or our western rivers.

It would be a disaster if some drongo farmer decided he would like some in his farm dam and they then escape into the river system.

The combined effect of carp and tilapia in the Murray/Darling would be a national catastrophe.

A few years ago a small population was discovered in one of the gulf rivers ( The Gunpowder I think)and the whole river system was poisoned with rotenone.

It was perceived that if they reached the gulf waters they would have a disastrous effect on the gulf fishery so such a drastic step had to be taken.

Cheers

Ray

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Most waterways in Qld don't have them & it would be nice to keep it that way.

I wouldn't agree with you there

What, you'd like to see them in more waterways!! Why??

No I was disagreeing with the part where you said they aren't in most waterways, Of course I wouldnt like to the see more of them

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OK Milan.

Also from the workshop, fisheries attempted to eliminate tilapia from a flooded quarry. It was heavily netted then poisoned.

A few months later the tilapia were back almost certainly due to human action.

Like Rayken said, the big fight is to keep them out of the Murray/Darling system where the only way for them to get in would be through human agency.

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During my time at UQ ( Over 4 years now )I've always crossed the uq lakes to get to my lectures which is right beside the main lake thus I travel through the three lakes and being a fisherman my eyes are always attracted to the water every time i pass them... Last Wednesday as i was crossing the first set of lakes something caught my eye which wasn't the typical eel or turtle... At first i thought :woohoo: UQ has introduced bass into there lakes! Until i took a closer look at BAM! WTF it was small schools of Tilapia all around the lake :ohmy: :sick: they were around the 10cm mark or more! I just cant believe this happened all of a sudden! I wonder if the UQ lake maintenance know about this...

Does this mean i can fish in the lakes for a Tilly Bash every now and then? :)

Big shock to me when i saw the schools of them scattered everywhere, like leaves on the surface of the water...

They have been there all year. I did not start noticing them (and like you a always look) until after the flood.

There are easily 40cm+ models in there as well but are usually solitary.

I have been tempted to do a sneaky pre dawn session there to catch one bur using bait there would be no way to avoid the gautunteed by catch of eels, turtles and maybe a duck!

Angus

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During my time at UQ ( Over 4 years now )I've always crossed the uq lakes to get to my lectures which is right beside the main lake thus I travel through the three lakes and being a fisherman my eyes are always attracted to the water every time i pass them... Last Wednesday as i was crossing the first set of lakes something caught my eye which wasn't the typical eel or turtle... At first i thought :woohoo: UQ has introduced bass into there lakes! Until i took a closer look at BAM! WTF it was small schools of Tilapia all around the lake :ohmy: :sick: they were around the 10cm mark or more! I just cant believe this happened all of a sudden! I wonder if the UQ lake maintenance know about this...

Does this mean i can fish in the lakes for a Tilly Bash every now and then? :)

Big shock to me when i saw the schools of them scattered everywhere, like leaves on the surface of the water...

They have been there all year. I did not start noticing them (and like you a always look) until after the flood.

There are easily 40cm+ models in there as well but are usually solitary.

I have been tempted to do a sneaky pre dawn session there to catch one bur using bait there would be no way to avoid the gautunteed by catch of eels, turtles and maybe a duck!

Angus

Take the lures then - biggest tilly i've ever caught was on surface

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During my time at UQ ( Over 4 years now )I've always crossed the uq lakes to get to my lectures which is right beside the main lake thus I travel through the three lakes and being a fisherman my eyes are always attracted to the water every time i pass them... Last Wednesday as i was crossing the first set of lakes something caught my eye which wasn't the typical eel or turtle... At first i thought :woohoo: UQ has introduced bass into there lakes! Until i took a closer look at BAM! WTF it was small schools of Tilapia all around the lake :ohmy: :sick: they were around the 10cm mark or more! I just cant believe this happened all of a sudden! I wonder if the UQ lake maintenance know about this...

Does this mean i can fish in the lakes for a Tilly Bash every now and then? :)

Big shock to me when i saw the schools of them scattered everywhere, like leaves on the surface of the water...

They have been there all year. I did not start noticing them (and like you a always look) until after the flood.

There are easily 40cm+ models in there as well but are usually solitary.

I have been tempted to do a sneaky pre dawn session there to catch one bur using bait there would be no way to avoid the gautunteed by catch of eels, turtles and maybe a duck!

Angus

Your certainly right about no guarantee that you wont catch a eel, turtle or duck >

they have been rotten with carp 20 years ago when I used to go to uni

They are still in there a few years ago i was crossing and there was a school of 15 black coloured carp and Ive seen a whopper before it would have been a 60cm model!

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