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Is it true


sari96

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I read a recent article about the way native Bream have evolved in the last 20 years, coinciding with the introduction of canal estates and the rise of CCTV security in Australia. Basically, the conclusion was that the radio frequencies emitted by home security and back to base CCTV security systems interferes with the Bream's echolocation sensory ability. As you would know, most fish do not see very well with their eyes, but can pick up on vibrations and electrical currents emitted by other fish. This is why many lures vibrate. What they have found over the past few years is that bream can now pickup the signals from the cameras, and will actually be able to see from when you are within 22.3-18.6 meters of the waters edge.

The reason you are seeing bream is because they actually knew you were coming and came to the surface to check you out. There is a simple way to get around this, and that is to avoid the cameras, the same way a burglar would. I would suggest wearing all black, a hoodie and buy a balaclava, that way the fish shouldn't see you coming and you can surprise them with your lures.

Good luck

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I read a recent article about the way native Bream have evolved in the last 20 years, coinciding with the introduction of canal estates and the rise of CCTV security in Australia. Basically, the conclusion was that the radio frequencies emitted by home security and back to base CCTV security systems interferes with the Bream's echolocation sensory ability. As you would know, most fish do not see very well with their eyes, but can pick up on vibrations and electrical currents emitted by other fish. This is why many lures vibrate. What they have found over the past few years is that bream can now pickup the signals from the cameras, and will actually be able to see from when you are within 22.3-18.6 meters of the waters edge.

The reason you are seeing bream is because they actually knew you were coming and came to the surface to check you out. There is a simple way to get around this, and that is to avoid the cameras, the same way a burglar would. I would suggest wearing all black, a hoodie and buy a balaclava, that way the fish shouldn't see you coming and you can surprise them with your lures.

Good luck

Haha interesting, I'll take that on board thank you!

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That's great woody, would that be why I don't catch fish in my bcf hat but always pull a good bag when my face is covered from the sun? So they any see me? Awesome I'll be sure to cover up next time.

I saw a couple of lads chasing tuna the other day all covered up too perhaps they were covering from the CCTV around amity

Callum

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Do a Google search for 'Snell’s window'. Light travels at a different speed through water which has the interesting effect of bending it when it meets air. If you sit on the bottom of a swimming pool and look up you'll see a circle of light that is a 180° angle of view of everything above the surface. So yes, if you can see a fish it stands a very good chance of seeing you... not to mention hearing you. Probably useful info for many AFO'rs. Since a large proportion of a fishes threats come from the surface they've adapted very well to being jumpy if anything unusual suddenly enters their environment. Pays to have water craft when hunting fish. So, slow, quiet and camouflaged. Unless of course they're in a mad feeding frenzy which is when they tend to let their guard down.

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Is it true that if you can see the fish, it can see you because I always spot massive bream in the canal and they never take the lure/ plastic, they just run off :/

I seriously never know if I should be taking your questions seriously bud.. but I'll bite on this one and give you my 2 cents.

Bream don't give a rats until you're pretty much on top of them. If you have polarised sunnies, you'll spot them before they spook. If you don't, chances are by the time you spot them and prep for a shot at them, they'll be gone.

Don't cast on top of them, don't make a big splash cast. Get it 10-30cm away from their nose and they'll 50% of the time swim towards it to have a look.

If you are still spooking them, you're doing it wrong.

My advice for all of these questions you seem to keep asking here, get to a social. Ask people questions there and observe how they fish. You'll pick up more and you'll maybe get some more honest answers. If you hadn't noticed you're being baited by a few people here. You're taking their offerings like a flattie taking anything going by.

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Do a Google search for 'Snell’s window'. Light travels at a different speed through water which has the interesting effect of bending it when it meets air. If you sit on the bottom of a swimming pool and look up you'll see a circle of light that is a 180° angle of view of everything above the surface. So yes, if you can see a fish it stands a very good chance of seeing you... not to mention hearing you. Probably useful info for many AFO'rs. Since a large proportion of a fishes threats come from the surface they've adapted very well to being jumpy if anything unusual suddenly enters their environment. Pays to have water craft when hunting fish. So, slow, quiet and camouflaged. Unless of course they're in a mad feeding frenzy which is when they tend to let their guard down.

Amongst the rubbish, myth, rumour and poor attempts at humour generally posted in reply a gem :) One of the fundamental keys to sight fishing species which have evolved to visually hunt prey on the surface and above and avoid their predators.

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I read a recent article about the way native Bream have evolved in the last 20 years, coinciding with the introduction of canal estates and the rise of CCTV security in Australia. Basically, the conclusion was that the radio frequencies emitted by home security and back to base CCTV security systems interferes with the Bream's echolocation sensory ability. As you would know, most fish do not see very well with their eyes, but can pick up on vibrations and electrical currents emitted by other fish. This is why many lures vibrate. What they have found over the past few years is that bream can now pickup the signals from the cameras, and will actually be able to see from when you are within 22.3-18.6 meters of the waters edge.

The reason you are seeing bream is because they actually knew you were coming and came to the surface to check you out. There is a simple way to get around this, and that is to avoid the cameras, the same way a burglar would. I would suggest wearing all black, a hoodie and buy a balaclava, that way the fish shouldn't see you coming and you can surprise them with your lures.

Good luck

the evolutionary process is actually now so complete that divers have found records of license plate numbers and car makes, models and colours all kept underwater in the canals - usually written on the underside of large boats

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Do a Google search for 'Snell’s window'. Light travels at a different speed through water which has the interesting effect of bending it when it meets air. If you sit on the bottom of a swimming pool and look up you'll see a circle of light that is a 180° angle of view of everything above the surface. So yes, if you can see a fish it stands a very good chance of seeing you... not to mention hearing you. Probably useful info for many AFO'rs. Since a large proportion of a fishes threats come from the surface they've adapted very well to being jumpy if anything unusual suddenly enters their environment. Pays to have water craft when hunting fish. So, slow, quiet and camouflaged. Unless of course they're in a mad feeding frenzy which is when they tend to let their guard down.

Amongst the rubbish, myth, rumour and poor attempts at humour generally posted in reply a gem :) One of the fundamental keys to sight fishing species which have evolved to visually hunt prey on the surface and above and avoid their predators.

Well this is nothing new, I thought all fishermen would relise this just as common knowledge and sense :whistle: like saying wild birds fly off when approached because to avoid predators, common knowledge

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