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Found 3 results

  1. AUS-BNE-FISHO

    50cm

    From the album: The River (Brisbane)

  2. Hi all Today was the day I had my charter for my b'day. It was at the Gold Coast, around the Jumpinpin/GC Seaway area. I was fishing onboard Coastal Spot Fishing Safaris, which is owned by Thomas Seabach. It was my third time going out with him. We certainly had our hopes high, as each other time it had been great fishing. Here is a link to their website - http://www.coastalsportsfishing.com.au/ I went to bed early last night so I could wake up early, as we were driving there in the morning. I managed to wake myself twice over the night, once at 11:00PM, and the other time at 3:30AM. My clock eventually went off though, at 4:30AM. After preparing everything, we were out of the house by five. It took a bit over an hour to get there, and we were eventually at the Runaway Bay boat ramp, waiting for Thomas. He got there, at 6:30AM on the dot, and we were on the water at about quarter to seven. The first part of the day was to catch live bait. We motored into the first location, and saw some rises, but unfortunately after he did a few casts of the net we had nothing, so to the next canal we went. Yep, you guessed it - nothing after about 20 more minutes in this canal... We finally found an OK spot, up one of the side canals. As well as herring, there were some big mullet being chased, and something really big chasing them. Jack? Trevally? Bait was eventually caught, which consisted of some big herring and a lone silver biddy. We motored out to the first spot, the GC Seaway (mouth). It wasn't very nice here, but I was feeling OK. I dropped the first bait down, and in about ten minutes, I got a good hit. It either spat the hook, or I pulled the hook, but no hook hooked it. I was told it was most likely to be a jew, because of the strike. Bugger! I really wanted a legal jew today. Something far smaller began picking it after, and I set my circle hook in the mouth of a bream. It wasn't that big, 26cm, but we like our bream, and while we get little meat off it, it is still good. I quickly pulled up another one, but it was to borderline to keep so back he went. My dad had still gotten nothing - surprising. This spot we normally pull up lots of big, solid, breambos but right now, it was quiet. At least i got something! I started to feel sick, and since it was just us onboard, and i was told to go back if I even felt slightly crook, we reeled our lines in and went to drift for flatties. My dad's line actually had a small one on, which turned out to be a sand flathead. Cool! That was the first one of them I've ever seen. At flatty spot number one, we managed a grand total of... Nothing! The guide was flicking a little blade, while we were still drifting. He managed a couple though. A flatty, one or two centimetres under legal size, and a flounder, which unfortunately spat the hook as it was coming into the boat. The next spot was similar for us, but there was still some action. Thomas was getting the odd hit on his lure, and while I was caught off guard my line went off. I missed the strike completely though, and lost what would've been an OK fish. Sigh! The last spot we shot off to was another flat area. Thomas said there is good structure, weed patches, that is. That means it's good for squid, as well as flatties. We started our drift, and down went our live herrings. It was quiet for quite a while, and we had some choc-chip biccies, but then I got a hit. I struck hard, and probably started pulling up my catch to eagerly. It just so happens this was a squid, and the second it saw us, it dropped the hook . It was apparently an OK one too. (Thomas saw it). I love calamari. That was disappointing. We kept up the drift though, and in the last five minutes of the days session, I struck, and I WAS ON! Woohoo. A short fight ensured an OK flatty coming up, which looked very borderline legal. We measured it, and it was 38cm... Ahh, that was disappointing. One keeper for the whole day! It wasn't happy to see us - tried to run away from the boat twice! (On the surface!). We got back to the ramp, and I took out the left over herring (not many) for freezer baits. We chucked the bream and herring in the esky, and after saying thank you and our goodbye's to Thomas, we went on the journey home. It really was a nice day out. Just enough wind to keep us at a good temperature, good boat, good food... The only disappointing thing was that we struck out on the fish . Me looking depressed with a 26cm keeper I cleaned the fish when I got home, which is pretty hard when it is so small. In hindsight, I should've scaled, gutted, and just kept the rest of the body on the maximise meat but I knocked some fillets off and did a dodgy bone removal job. I need to improve my filleting! (Tomorrow's dinner) Here are the stats of the trip - Trip stats - Tide: High tide, 8:35AM, 1.26M, Low tide, 3:10PM, .37M Moon Phase: 56% full, so not the strongest run Tackle used: I'm unsure on most of it, but we had large-small ball sinkers (depending on current), small circle hooks, and small lines. Fish caught: Yellowfin Bream x 2, Sand Flathead x 1, Dusky Flathead x 2, Flounder x 1 Bait caught: Herring and biddy Bait used: Herring Water Temp: 17.5 degrees Celsius Air Pressure: 1017 Overall Success Rate: 50% - A good day out at least Hope you all enjoyed this report, because it'd done now. We certainly didn't do as good as expected, but at least we got onto a couple of fish in the whole day. Sadly for me, my hols are over, but they's been great fun, with lots of fishing... Oh yeah, and there are still three mor BR sessions to be reported (not that they are that exciting though). Cheers Hamish
  3. Hi all I'm putting up the report from my last few days fishing at the local park. This is from Thursday until today. Some sessions were certainly more exciting than others, and hopefully you're all not bored to death by another series of reports! I got down to the local park and had the lines in at about quarter past two. I had the lines in first off baited with dead prawn from last session. To catch bait this time though, I'd done something different - made burley. The mix was very simple, but I'll do a quick walk through of it as well. You will need the following - 1. Breadcrumbs - 2. Chicken Pellets/other pellets 3. Tuna oil (one of the stinkiest things on earth in my opinion) - First off, layer the bottom of your container (for the purpose of this I used an ice cream tub) with breadcrumbs. You can also just buy a cheap $1 loaf of bread from Woolies and rip it up into small bits. Once you have a layer of this, do the same, but with your pellets. Continue to do this until you have the amount of berley you want. Make sure you are giving it a good mix so both of the things are well dispersed into one another. When you're done, get your tuna oil. (DISGUSTING ALERT!!!). Give the mix a generous splash of this. That is the recipe done. Easy peasy. I found this worked excellent on baits, but it also attracted some undesirables, like glassies. Back to the report. I chucked a bit of this in the water (get yourself something to scoop/deploy it with as it stinks you up if you hold it), gave it a couple minutes, and then threw the net in the general vicinity. As well as a bunch of bloody glassies, up came a couple prawns. I put them on the lighter lines, as these weren't to big, and then kept casting. It actually didn't take long for a lighter line to go off, as I saw a couple nibbles, then a big strike... I ran up, but unfortunately, whatever it was it didn't hook up. On one of the first throws, I felt a big more weight in the net than usual. I was hoping for a mullet, or at least a school of something, but up came another baby bream. I think it's very good there are juvenile ones around here, because it means that they are being bred into the river, and, where there's small ones there's normally bigguns, or so I think... Here it is - Juvenile Yellowfin Bream - roughly 20cm After that, it all went a bit quiet. I was still getting lots of prawns and glassies (more of the latter), and the glassies would almost always be stuck right in the net and take a couple minutes to come out. So annoying. I kept berleying, and they kept coming up in the net. I found the best way to get them out was to just give them a big flick, which therefore flinged them back into the water. The prawns on the heavy line just kept getting pickered, and since these glassies were so hardy, I decided to see how the went as bait. I pinned two through the area just below the fins, and they swum as hard as a biddy. The next catch did not come until later... I decided to give the line out deep a check. It had been pushed towards the pylons, and as I pulled it up there was a lot of weight with it. I thought it may be a catfish, or an eel even, but when I got it up I realised it must just be some log/wood. On closer inspection, I realised it was a bunch of line and sinker from the ground. I wonder who's it may be... Mine? I was quite curious. How much of this would be in the whole, entire, ocean, polluting many areas??? My glassies were still going strong, but unfortunately nothing else was biting. What does that mean? Cast netting, of course! I started throwing the net to top up on the prawns. More glassies and less prawns, though. As I went for another throw, I saw the glassy line buckle over. I pulled up the net as fast as I could, and picked up the other line. I knew it wasn't big after about 5 seconds into the fight, and in about a minutes I had an OK catfish up. No photo for this one, I actually flicked him off the hook so quickly I forgot The day was very quiet after the catfish, and after more relentless picking attacks I got the final haul of prawns out of the live bait tank (not too many but some were Ok size) and chucked them in the esky. I was also fishing with someone else, whom could pancake my net very well. he was fishing for big sharks/cod, but it was very quiet for him. No hits or anything except pickers. I think it also is worth a mention how low the tide was when I got there, which initially helped with the berleying and bait catching - That is the first report done for now, here are the stats of the trip - Statistics of trip - Tide: Moon Phase: Fish caught: Yellowfin bream x 1, catfish x 1 Bait caught: Prawns and glassies Bait used: Live prawns and glassies Tackle Used: 10lb, 14lb, and 30lb braided mainlines, 20lb and 30lb fluorocarbon leader, 80lb trace, size 2 and six ball/bean sinkers, size 4/o circle and suicide hooks, large-ish barrel swivel. Size 1000 and 2500 Shimano Sienna and Nasci, Size 650 Penn Reel, 6"6' and 8" Ugly Stik rod, 2M Rogue Firepoint boat rod, Size 2500 Daiwa Shinobi reel Weather: Sunny, slightly cloudy Overall Success Rate: 40% - Like the other sesh, at least it wasn't a donut!!! OK, now to the next report. This time I was fishing with my mate, Hayden, and he wanted to come down at 1:30PM. I met him there a little bit after that, and we got fishing. It was a dead low tide as I got there, which is normally a good tide here. Today was no exception. On the first throw, I got a few prawns, so the lines were thrown out with livies. That continued, and I also continued berleying up the water for bait. More prawns, as well as some glassies. Unfortunately, the pickers would not leave us alone. The prawns just kept getting eaten and eaten! I decided to throw a line in off the jetty to try and get my friend a fish, so with a little live prawn on, I gave him the line to hold. It wasn't long before he got picked to bits. This happened a couple more times, but then when he was getting some nibbles he handed to me. I felt the nibbles, and then felt the rod load up, and then I was on!!! Briefly... The fish dropped the bait as quick as it took it, so that was mildly disappointing. With this , we put the line next to the jetty pylons to see if any fish would eat it there. It was very quiet for the next part of the session, apart from more live prawns and more pickers... As I was doing a quick check of the line, not much was happening on it. I walked back down onto the jetty to do more cast netting, but as I went down I saw the rod next to the pylons get some nibbles, and then I heard the reel squeaking. I tightened the drag, and I was on! Woohoo. It was only a small cat, but both my mate and I had some fun free spooling the line, then pulling it back up again for more 'fight time'. Here it is - Dirty Catfish I de-hooked him, and grabbed him by the tail throwing him back into the drink. It was then more quiet-ness, and my dad eventually came down. He said I had/should go home soon, and my mate wanted me to come back with him so I began packing up at about 5 to five. As I was reeling in the salmon line though, it was a lot heavier than usual. I was still reeling very quickly, and drag was actually coming out. To my surprise, a river perch came up. No fight to it at all... And it clearly explains what's been picking me - those dirty, old, perch! Hopefully these pickers bugger off! That was the end of the session, except for me taking home 5 or so prawns, as I didn't have that many more in the bait tank in the first place! I packed up the cart and got home. A nice, warm, shower certainly helped with the cold temperature outside. Here are the stats of this report - Statistics of trip - Tide: 9:00AM, 1.8M, high, 3:20PM, .2M, Low, 9:50PM, 2.4M, high Fish caught:River perch x 1, Catfish x 1 Bait caught: Prawns Bait used:Live and dead prawns Tackle used: 10lb, 14lb, and 30lb braided mainlines, 20lb and 30lb fluorocarbon leader, 80lb trace, size 2 and six ball/bean sinkers, size 4/o circle and suicide hooks, large-ish barrel swivel. Size 1000 and 2500 Shimano Sienna and Nasci, Size 650 Penn Reel, 6"6' and 8" Ugly Stik rod, 2M Rogue Firepoint boat rod, Size 2500 Daiwa Shinobi reel Weather: Nice, not to hot or cold, mild winds Overall Success Rate: 55% - At least it wasn't a donut OK, if you're still reading, this is a bit embarrassing. I went out yesterday morning, for a session. I thought it would be a good one, as I have always done good on the +5 +11 session logic/pattern (probably a bit more of an religious thing than truth). It was freezing cold, and even though I was in my thermals, I needed to throw the cast net. On my first throw, I got a butter bream, all the way up the river. This interested me very much, and I was curious to see why. It then became evident my hands and feet were very cold, and, well, that's why I left in about 30 minutes of getting there. LOL. Cool - that's a first - Brisbane River Butter Bream! OK, so here is the final report. The most exciting one too. I'm hoping you haven't lost interest and you're still with me. I got to the park at about 2:15PM today, and the tide was still about half way up, running out. Not quite ideal, but the run out was (it was the tide height that wasn't). I had a hard time gathering bait first off, with only occasional prawns in my first casts. Once I got enough though, each line was out (I had four lines, as a mate was there too). One of them didn't last that long though, as it got snagged, and would not come off even with a heap of pulling and yanking from all angles with our hands. My friend cut it with the knife, and that line was not re-rigged all day. Prawns were by no means plentiful, but I was starting to get a couple. The salmon line was pickered, numerous times (I witnessed this while cast netting), and I wasn't having much success with throwing the net. It seems the pickers first rip off the prawns legs, then eyes, then head, and then the body (somehow miraculously missing my hook!). More cast netting, after cast netting, and then a bait check, was basically what I was doing... I eventually got a school of glassies, so as last resort I live baited a couple of the buggers and sent them out, hopefully for something golden. My friend head off soon after, at about 4:30PM. The first run of the day was again, soon after this. I was cast netting, and heard my little Sienna screaming. I pulled up the net, and hastily got up there. Unfortunately, the fish had dropped the bait. I believe it was a small catfish, anyways. They are actually a speedy little fish. I stayed up at the top of the jetty, with the two lighter lines, while the salmon line and glassies soaked. The line in the cod spot got pickered, so I dropped it down with another live prawn (I'd also caught some more live shrimp, river shrimp, in the cast net). It didn't take long for a peck-peck, and then the rod to load up. I thought it was just a picker, but before I knew it the line was screaming off the reel, as fast as a cheater! I started trying to get this fish to the surface, as it was beyond me what it could be. Bream? Cod? After about two minutes of screaming runs, up came a big lizard (I believe it was a blue-spot flathead, because the tail was blue). There were some nervous moments, as when I began walking it down to the jetty it nearly ran into the pylons and did me in, and then again as we were netting it (some passersby did the honours). He/she was landed. Relief! Sadly, it was hooked right down it's gob, so I cut the line. I hope it spits the hook quickly. It's battle wasn't over, either. It went crazy the second I lipped it, and before it was trying to slither back into the drink. I grabbed the photo real quickly though, and got it back into the drink. With one big splash this biggun was off! Woohoo. A solid 60cm Brisbane River lizard. How's that?! Another man had also came down with a rod and reel, and a lire. He had a quick flick, but annoyingly for him he got snagged on his second cast. Bugger! We then had a chat, and i found out he was actually just on holidays, and he found a fishing rod in the house he was staying in. "Why not?" he said. He said he also came from Cairns, where he is a bit (lot) more serious. He catches big queenfish trolling lures on a handline off the back of his surfski. Pretty cool if you ask me. His real target was mackerel, where he's only hooked (and been busted off) by one. While we were having a chinwag, my line, with live shrimp, went off, and after a short fight, up came a little catfish - At about quarter past five, Dad told me to come home, so we said goodby to one another and then I packed up, and was on my way. I was extremely happy with the flatty today's session, as it is my first 60cm flatty with a pic (I got one with a mate in Marcoola in the surf a few years ago, but chose to release so no photo. It was estimated 60cm - odd). I was home, happier than ever. Here are the stats of this trip - Statistics of trip - Tide: 11:35AM, 1.7M, High, 5:30PM, .3M, Low Moon Phase: Waning Gibbous phase, 98% full moon, so a lot of run Fish caught: Bluespot flathead x 1, Catfish x 1 Bait caught: Banana Prawns and River Shrimp Bait used: Live and dead prawns and river shrimp Air Pressure: 1024 Tackle Used: 10lb, 14lb, and 30lb braided mainlines, 20lb and 30lb fluorocarbon leader, 80lb trace, size 2 and six ball/bean sinkers, size 4/o circle and suicide hooks, large-ish barrel swivel. Size 1000 and 2500 Shimano Sienna and Nasci, Size 650 Penn Reel, 6"6' and 8" Ugly Stik rod, 2M Rogue Firepoint boat rod, Size 2500 Daiwa Shinobi reel Weather: Nice cool weather - minimum wind Time fished: 2:15PM - 5:10PM Overall Success Rate: 85% - While it wasn't the target species, it was bloody solid! Thanks for reading guys, I know it was a bit or a report-marathon. Hope you all enjoyed. Cheers Hamish