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benno573

Nz Duck Hunting Trip

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6 hours ago, benno573 said:

Hey mate. 

As far as eating them, generally breast them out and that’s it. The leg and thigh meat has great flavor but the texture of a rubber band so is generally not worth the effort for what is generally a very small recovery. Same story with the turkeys unfortunately - not even Hagar the Horrible would be able to get through those drumsticks - tough as. You can also breast a bird in about 90 seconds vs a lot of plucking and gutting so the ROI doesn’t really add up.

i did manage to shoot a Muscovy duck which are also feral over there - basically your general white domestic duck - they are a much better option to roast if that spins your wheels. Other than that mallards and paradise shell ducks were the order of the day.

 

cooking - duck nuggets are awesome, just breast meat with a coating and fried, I did some breast slices wrapped in bacon which were really good as well. Turkeys -  the tenderloins are marinated/coated and cooked, the bulk of the breast is minced and turned into burgers, turkey mince bolagnaise, meatballs and stuff like that. 

YUM!!! So keen.

We ate a few wood ducks when I was in my teens. They were rubber balls and put us off. 

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23 hours ago, benno573 said:

Unfortunately not (legally) mate. If it’s commercially prepared meat you’re able to declare it and bring it back but not wild game unfortunately. Definitely mad fun though.

Very interesting as my kiwi uncle brought over some smoked marlin that he caught a few years ago (although I am not sure if he declared it or not .......... ).

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12 hours ago, kmcrosby78 said:

Very interesting as my kiwi uncle brought over some smoked marlin that he caught a few years ago (although I am not sure if he declared it or not .......... ).

haha I bet he is not the first, or the last, Kiwi to bring undeclared smoked fish to Australia.

If it was cured I can't see why it would be a bio-security risk. How was it? 

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38 minutes ago, ellicat said:

Mate, what a top trip. Such beautiful countryside, but oh those hills....

Popping out of those lay-out blinds gives me a giggle for some reason. Almost Pythonesque.

How'd the knee hold up ?

How good is Ninja.

Yep I agree how good is Ninja. It would be worth doing the trip just to spend time with the doggo. 

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@ellicat - you would not enjoy the hills at all.  i struggled a bit with a couple of them, knee held up fine, just took my time.

@kmcrosby78 - i doubt that it would have been declared... and you'd probably get away with it 95% of the time.  the thought did cross my mind as the venison salami that Nath gets made is mindblowingly good - but i didn't want to risk losing one if they took it off me - would be such a waste!

@Drop Bear @ellicat having a ninja dog opens up so many more shooting opportunities that would otherwise not exist - mostly around flowing rivers and that sort of stuff where downed birds do not sit and wait.  for the rest he is still good to have as it saves me jumping on the kayak (see video) or climbing out of the layout blind and doing the fetching!  Also he is very quick to grab a crippled bird so it can be sorted out immediately.

he is also trained as a game indicating dog - he will scent deer/goats in the bush and locate a downed animal easily as well.  he is strong and fit enough that he can carry about 10kg in his saddlebags as well - handy if you drop a big red deer or a mob of goats and it's a long carry out.  also means he carries his own food and water in.  makes the whole hunting experience over there a lot easier - did take about 12 months solid of training as well as constant ongoing "top ups" to get to this point though.  if you check out some of Nath's other vids you will see him in action on things other than ducks.

you do have to be careful around ninja though. often when the action is a little slower in the maimai he will get bored and a cold wet nose will start to very forcefully burrow its way under your arm and all of a sudden a labrador head will appear on your chest. 

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1 hour ago, benno573 said:

you do have to be careful around ninja though. often when the action is a little slower in the maimai he will get bored and a cold wet nose will start to very forcefully burrow its way under your arm and all of a sudden a labrador head will appear on your chest. 

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I could take that haha. What a great story. I did not know that dogs were able to be so well trained. 

What I wouldn't do to get some of that venison salami! 

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5 hours ago, Drop Bear said:

I could take that haha. What a great story. I did not know that dogs were able to be so well trained. 

What I wouldn't do to get some of that venison salami! 

Mate it is eff good. Best salami I’ve ever eaten. Also good are goat and garlic sausages, venison saveloys, duck nuggets, turkey burgers, venny steaks, whole roast goat or venison legs on the Weber, abalone (paua) fritters... we don’t really go hungry hey...

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On ‎22‎/‎05‎/‎2019 at 8:35 AM, Drop Bear said:

haha I bet he is not the first, or the last, Kiwi to bring undeclared smoked fish to Australia.

If it was cured I can't see why it would be a bio-security risk. How was it? 

Delicious - was put into a dip with chives from memory.

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On 22/05/2019 at 6:52 PM, benno573 said:

Mate it is eff good. Best salami I’ve ever eaten. Also good are goat and garlic sausages, venison saveloys, duck nuggets, turkey burgers, venny steaks, whole roast goat or venison legs on the Weber, abalone (paua) fritters... we don’t really go hungry hey...

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Wow Yum!

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